[Epub] ❥ Ab excessu divi Augusti ➝ Tacitus – Anguillais.us

Ab excessu divi AugustiAnalele Istorisesc Faptele Intamplate De La Moartea Lui August Pana In Anul 66 Lacomia Ostasilor, Superficialitatea, Versatilitatea, Cruzimea Si, In General, Lipsa De Discernamant A Oamenilor, Setea De Putere, Desfraul Si Egoismul Fara Limite Al Unor Imparati Ii Sadesc In Suflet O Amaraciune Care Se Adanceste Pe Masura Ce Istoricul Patrunde Mai Adanc In Tainele Evenimentelor, Care, Sub Pana Lui, Devin Adevarate Drame Sau Tragedii Accentului Tragic Al Naratiei Ii Corespunde Stilul Concentrat, Cu Nuante Arhaizante Analele Reprezinta Opera De Maturitate A Acestui Stralucit Reprezentant Al Istoriografiei Romane N I Barbu

    10 thoughts on “[Epub] ❥ Ab excessu divi Augusti ➝ Tacitus – Anguillais.us


  1. says:

    This is less accessible than Tacitus Histories, in which the narrative of the civil war and the German revolt, actually aided by the richness of detail, gives coherence to the whole work By contrast The Annals covers a longer period fairly strictly year by year which breaks up the flows of particular events and works against analysis Tacitus may be working from sources that are less detailed in The Annals, he is certainly at a greater remove from the events, while his own experience as a Senator under the Emperor Domitian probably colours his attitudes to the treason trials under Tiberius and the plots against Nero.Tacitus has the insidious habit of writing opinion as though it were fact, for example Tiberius giving himself over to malevolent thoughts and secret orgies on Capri is a statement, but it seems unlikely that Tacitus had access to Tiberius diary Dear Diary, to distract myself from my malevolent thoughts I m going to have an orgy, just a secret little one, me, three hundred ballet dancers and half the sailors of the Imperial fleet Tacitus negative slants become hard to take at face value Of course it is a power grab when Livia seals off the house in which Augustus is dying and holds off announcing his death until Tiberius arrives, but since at the time before Augustus the Roman world had a series of civil wars, securing a peaceful succession is also perhaps, wise, prudent and stateswomanlike There are reasons for his neg...


  2. says:

    Posterity grants everybody the glory he is due. In preparation for my trip to Rome, I decided that it was finally time to read Tacitus I had been meaning to for a long while Edward Gibbon, my favorite historian, always spoke of Tacitus in terms of deep reverence and when your idols have idols, you had better see why.The Annals is Tacitus s last major historical work, considered by many to be his masterpiece In it, he covers the reigns of Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero though the books covering Caligula s reign have been lost to time As the title suggests, Tacitus takes an annalistic approach to his history, keeping the narrative in strict chronological order With such a style, it is difficult to pull away from the trees and see the forest rather, the reader often feels lost in the thickets of battles, intrigues, and executions The final effect is that of being pulled into the history, absorbed in its dramas and scandals, too engrossed for analysis.Tacitus s proclaimed motive for writing his history is the defects of his predecessors The histories of Tiberius, Gaius, Claudius, and Nero were distorted because of fear while they reigned, and, when they were gone, were composed with ani...


  3. says:

    A Game of Rome27 September 2015 As I was reading this for the second time I simply could not believe how brutal this piece of literature was, and what is impressive is that it is based on real life events It is authors like Tacitus that make me want to throw modern historical fiction into the fire place In fact he is the one reason that I simply won t write historical fiction because he has set the standard so high that at this stage in my life I simply could not even think of equalling, let alone exceeding, his mastery of story telling In fact, why don t historians write like Tacitus these days Why do that have to be so academic and dry when you could write a rollicking good story without having to create historical fiction Actually, I have to say that this story is actually brutal than A Game of Thrones Consider this, you have Agrippina, who is almost a carbon copy of Nero Though I have to admit that Nero was nowhere near as psychotic as Joffrey was at his age Hey, you could even consider Arminius to basically be this guy And if you like the fact that George R R Martin has yet to finish his epic then the same goes with Tacitus because this is how it ends Then, as his lingering death was very painful, he turned to Demetrius Okay, unlike Martin, Tacitus had originally completed his work though this is disputed because some suggested that he died before he could finish it , but unfortunately we hav...


  4. says:

    There is nothing quite like the terse and clean prose of Tacitus the leanness of which is apparently found in the Latin source as well as the English rendering and the way it provides the reader with such a comfortable passage through his Annals The coverage of the reign of Tiberius is liberal and thoroughly vituperative the reluctant Caesar he of the moving anecdote of pursuing the ex wife he truly loved across a Roman marketplace whilst sobbing bitterly at the cruel fate which forced him to share the matrimonial bed with Augustus lascivious daughter, Julia is presented in a severely unfavorable light From the opening moments of his reign shown to be a dissembling fool and butt of some gentle but searing mockery from the Senators, the Tiberius of Tacitus tale is an inwardly brooding and rancorous monarch alternately under the thumb of his overweening mother and his ambitious and cunning Praetorian Prefect, Sejanus whose behavior was somewhat restrained by the moderating maternal influence when she passed on, all the black passions and lusts of his twisted soul were given their free reign Although later histories have presented the Imperial administration of Tiberius as one of general competence and peace the only real danger lay in being either a member of the Imperial family or that of the capital city s aristocracy , none possess the august flavor of the Annals, and his portrait of Tiberius is always the one uppermost i...


  5. says:

    The great benefit of a republic is the slowness with which it moves In America or Rome, the long, careful consideration of matters by fractious, embittered rivals tend to assure that the only measures which pass are those which are beneficial, or those which are useless In a dictatorship, much may be achieved In little time, a great man may do a great many things, and a lesser man make many errors.As Tacitus, Machiavelli, Jefferson, or any proponent of the republic will tell you, great men are scarce, but you will never want for the lesser kind If you marvel at my inclusion of Machiavelli among men of the republic, you may be surprised to hear that the vast majority of his works were against tyranny, and his well known work about tyrants did not paint them in a very flattering light.Tacitus portraits of these Roman tyrants is much less than flattering, echoing Sallust s partisan accounts After all, Plutarch s example was to paint history in terms of moral lessons, that the past is full of errors we can learn to avoid and of virtues to which we might aspire But the time of the Annals was one mainly of errors, with virtues serving only to highlight the tragic fates of those who tried to uphold them.Tacitus also took his Latinate style from Sallust, narrowing it into concise aphorisms which his English translators ...


  6. says:

    It all sounds strangely like something Steven Erikson would write Nero substituted as culprits, and punished with the utmost refinements of cruelty, a class of men, loathed for their vices, whom the crowd styled Christians Christus, the founder of the name, had undergone the death penalty in the reign of Tiberius, by sentence of the procurator Pontius Pilatus, and the pernicious superstition was checked for a moment, only to break out once , not merely in Judaea, the home of the disease, but in the capital itself, where all things horrible or shameful in the world collect and find a vogue First, then, the confessed members of the sect were arrested next, on their disclosures, vast numbers were convicted, not so much on the count of arson as for hatred of the human race And derision accompanied their end they were covered with wild beasts skins and torn to death by dogs or they were fastened on crosses, and, when daylight failed were burned to serve as ...


  7. says:

    The Annals is Tacitus s final history It covers the Julio Claudian emperors from the death of Augustus 14 A.D almost to the end of Nero s reign 68 A.D Sections of the Annals were lost, e.g Caligula, Nero s death and events leading to Galba s accession, and what historians believe was a planned section covering the forty one year reign of arguably the greatest of all Roman emperors, Augustus.Tacitus 55 A.D to 117 A.D was an orator and politician, as well as historian, and it s believed that his high position in the administration quaestor, praetor, senator and consul under the Flavian emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian and two of the Good Emperors Nerva and Trajan provided him access to the senate s records, making his histories of the period among the most reliable Moreover, under Nerva and Trajan, Tacitus was relatively free to criticize the excesses and corruption of the Julio ...


  8. says:

    Augustus might have established the Principate, but it was up to his successors to continue it and prevent Rome from once against descending into civil war Tacitus in The Annals of Imperial Rome, the reigns of the Caesars from Tiberius to the death of Nero which would lead to the events in the writer s The Histories.The work begins with Tacitus reviewing the reign of Augustus and how Tiberius became his successor, over his popular nephew Germanicus whose side of the family would eventual rule Tiberius shrewdly attempts to be modest in claiming the Imperial title, but this hides his dark nature that he developed during his self imposed exile before becoming Augustus heir Under Tiberius is when the show trials and political persecutions of leading men that would begin that would become notorious under later Emperors The middle and the very end of Tiberius reign, all of Gaius Caligula s reign, and the first half of Claudius reign have been lost Tacitus work picks up with how Claudius wife Messalina was brought down and his niece Agrippina shrewdly manipulating her way into marriage...


  9. says:

    A friend of mine who teaches Latin for a living says it was this book and Suetonius The Twelves Caesars that led to her fascination with things Roman and a change in her concentration I wasn t hugely enad at first As our initial conversation went Me Well, so far this isn t five star love it, but not first star hate.Her Keep going It s good for you.Me Like broccoli Well, in the end it was like a feast This does have its dry patches I considered dropping it a star because of that but decided it just had too much that was awesome This is a year by year narrative of Imperial Roman history from the reign of Tiberius to that of Nero, from 14 to 66 AD Tacitus at times gives accounts of trials of people who aren t exactly famous It s as if 2,000 years later one is reading bulletins of trials of John Edwards and Rod Blagojevich Military battles and mutinies are related in sometimes for me eye glazing detail But though the events described here happened largely before Tacitus was born, being high up in the state himself, he had access to first hand Senate records and of course he must have known people who could give him...


  10. says:

    Before there was George R R Martin, there was Tacitus Though fragmentary and incomplete, the Annals have definitively captured the public imagination regarding the Julio Claudian dynasty and the early years of the Roman Principate their sensationalist qualities and questionable historical accuracy notwithstanding The surviving material covers the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero The absence of Caligula, perhaps the most notorious of all Roman emperors, is a notable disappointment but even in the surviving books, there is no shortage of drama When reading the Annals, one stylistic trait of Tacitus s writing presents itself immediately, and this is his heavy usage of indirect quotations, wherein he sort of channels the thoughts of the characters he portrays without quoting them directly He is certainly not as dry as Livy he has a real flair for the dramatic and does not shy away from interjecting with some of his own thoughts He presents his history as an unfolding moral drama, with wars abroad, intrigue at home, and traditional Roman values being everywhere discarded Tacitus is often painted as a cynic in the present day sense of the word, not in reference to the philosophical school If he is, then he also lives up to the old adage about cynics that they are merely disappointed idealists In Book 3, he gives us a surprisingly Rousseauian accou...

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