[Epub] ↠ Eros the Bittersweet Author Anne Carson – Anguillais.us

Eros the Bittersweet The Insights Presented In The Volume Are Many And Wide Ranging, Recognizably In Tune With The Subtlest Modern Discussions Of Desire Such As Triangulation Or Loving What Others Love , Yet Offering New Solutions To Old Problems, Like The Proper Interpretation Of Plato S Phaedrus On The Frequently Discussed Effect Of Literacy On Greek Civilization, The Book Offers A Fresh View It Was No Accident That The Poets Who Invented Eros Were Also The First Readers And Writers Of The Western Literate Tradition.Originally Published In 1986.The Princeton Legacy Library Uses The Latest Print On Demand Technology To Again Make Available Previously Out Of Print Books From The Distinguished Backlist Of Princeton University Press These Paperback Editions Preserve The Original Texts Of These Important Books While Presenting Them In Durable Paperback Editions The Goal Of The Princeton Legacy Library Is To Vastly Increase Access To The Rich Scholarly Heritage Found In The Thousands Of Books Published By Princeton University Press Since Its Founding In 1905.

[Epub] ↠ Eros the Bittersweet  Author Anne Carson – Anguillais.us
  • Paperback
  • 204 pages
  • Eros the Bittersweet
  • Anne Carson
  • English
  • 26 October 2017
  • 0691014493

    10 thoughts on “[Epub] ↠ Eros the Bittersweet Author Anne Carson – Anguillais.us


  1. says:

    If something terrible happens to me one day, and all that s left is my body, and if, around the same time, something terrible should happen to Anne Carson and all that s left is her brain, I would hope that somehow medical sc...


  2. says:

    Anne Carson s debut book is certainly an impressive piece of scholarship, which, for this particular reader, made this both a pleasure and a burden to trudge through Summoning her impressive knowledge of Greek drama, prose both philosophic and fictional and poetry, Carson conjures a daring argument about the symbiotic and triangular connections between words on a page, their writer and their reader, with the notion of desire as the Spanish Fly that keeps all the sweaty limbs and soiled shee Anne Carson s debut book is certainly an impressive piece of scholarship, which, for this particular reader, made this both a pleasure and a burden to trudge through Summoning her impressive knowledge of Greek drama, prose both philosophic and fictional and poetry, Carson conjures a daring argument about the symbiotic and triangular connections between words on a page, their writer and their reader, with the notion of desire as the Spanish Fly that keeps all the sweaty limbs and soiled sheets intertwined and sticky Organized in a series of short chapters, Carson makes her slow way from the poetic fragments of Sappho to her final destination ...


  3. says:

    In one of her chapters Anne Carson writes, Imagine a city where there is no desire Supposing for the moment that the inhabitants of the city continue to eat, drink and procreate in some mechanical way still, their life looks flat They do not theorize or spin tops or speak figuratively Few think to shun pain none give gifts They bury their dead and forget whereA city without desire is, in sum, a city of no imagination Carson s elucidation of this idea that desire is what mov In one of her chapters Anne Carson writes, Imagine a city where there is no desire Supposing for the moment that the inhabitants of the city continue to eat, drink and procreate in some mechanical way still, their life looks f...


  4. says:

    There are no words for how perfect this book is A gorgeous exploration of the edges of personhood, letters, desire Endlessly fascinating and utterly engrossing I couldn t put it down I want to fall in love A sample from a favorite passage The English word symbol is the Greek word symbolon which means, in the ancient world, one half of a knucklebone carried as a token of identity to someone who has the other half Together the two halves compose ...


  5. says:

    Both the experience of desire and the experience of reading have something to teach us about edges We have endeavored to see what that is by consulting ancient literature, lyric and romantic, for its exposition of eros We have watched how archaic poets shape love poems as triangles and how ancient novelists construct n...


  6. says:

    I have to admit, I read this book because oh so literary characters on The L Word dropped the name while flirting And again, I admit, I have also tried to talk about this book while hitting on women Why Because this book, so thick with Carson s immense knowledge of classical literature, is also incredibly roma...


  7. says:

    Anne Carson, following Sappho, argues that Eros is a lack, a wound, a gesture toward a wholeness that s only possibility exists in our total self annihilation This sort of also describes my relationship to this book I can only read it as a void, a gaping hole in myself, knowing that I ...


  8. says:

    It s all coming back to me now, why I dislike this kind of theoretical, transhistorical argument grounded in a series of close readings The author appears to believe that she has stumbled upon a deep psychological, even ontological, truth which transcends all context and time, as well as any counter example...


  9. says:

    As my background in literary analysis, as well as my knowledge of mythology and greek poetry isthan just meager, I m sure a good deal of what Carson was trying to tell me went straight through my head, unnoticed Nevertheless, reading about Eros, the indeed bittersweet has been one of the most enlightening rides in a long time Carson isn t only impressively learned across a number of disciplines, but her writing despite its academic packaging is conveying a humane intimacy, a witty and As my background in literary analysi...


  10. says:

    It is arguable, then, from the way they wrote and the tools they used, that ancient readers and writers conceived the Greek alphabet as a system of outlines or edges But let us penetrate beyond the physical procedure of their writing to the activity of mind that informs it It is an activity of symbolization Being a phonetic system, the Greek alphabet is concerned to symbolize not objects in the real world but the very process in which sounds act to construct speech Phonetic script imitates It is arguable, then, from the way they wrote and the tools they used, that ancient readers and writers conceived the Greek alphabet as a system of outlines or edges But let us penetrate beyond the physical procedure of their writing to the activity of mind that informs it It is an activity of symbolization Being a phonetic system, the Greek alphabet is concerned to symbolize not objects in the real world but the very process in which sounds act to construct speech Phonetic script imitates the activity of discourse itself The Greek alphabet revolutionized this imitative function through introduction of its consonant, which is a theoretic element, an abstraction The consonant functions by means of an act of imagination in the mind of the user I am writing this bo...

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